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Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of Intergroup migration of nonhuman primates found in the catalog.

Intergroup migration of nonhuman primates

Jean Balch Williams

Intergroup migration of nonhuman primates

a bibliography

by Jean Balch Williams

  • 22 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Primate Information Center, Regional Primate Research Center, University of Washington in Seattle .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Primates -- Bibliography,
  • Behavior, Animal -- Bibliography,
  • Social Behavior -- Bibliography

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJean Balch Williams.
    GenreBibliography.
    SeriesPrimate Information Center topical bibliographies -- 82-007
    ContributionsUniversity of Washington. Primate Information Center.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination21 p. ;
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17840899M
    OCLC/WorldCa9085101

    Tree of Origin: What Primate Behavior Can Tell Us about Human Social Evolution eBook: de Waal, Frans B. M., Byrne, Richard, Dunbar, Robin, McGrew, W.C., Pusey, Anne /5(7). We see how DNA analysis is revolutionizing our understanding of paternity, intergroup migration, and reproductive success. And we confront intriguing discoveries about primate hunting behavior, politics, cognition, diet, and the evolution of language and intelligence that challenge claims of human uniqueness in new and subtle ways/5(8).

    Another way to do so is to ask how humans differ from other species, particularly from our closest relatives, the nonhuman primates. The contributors to this book pursue both approaches, in an effort to understand how evolution has shaped modern human behavior and societies.   Using this approach, we review research on intergroup encounters in non-human primates published over the last 20 years, focusing on participation by different classes of individuals. While food- and mate-defence explain much between-sex variation in participation, rank and reproductive access frequently explain within-sex by:

    Migration is dangerous, difficult, and expensive in terms of energy." (Or you might not ask but I'll tell you anyway.) They do it because of seasonal changes; habitats become too cold or too dry, and food availability varies. Primates don't do this too much 'cause they're in the tropics so they're not too affected by seasonality. We see how DNA analysis is revolutionizing our understanding of paternity, intergroup migration, and reproductive success. And we confront intriguing discoveries about primate hunting behavior, politics, cognition, diet, and the evolution of language and intelligence that challenge claims of human uniqueness in new and subtle ways.


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Intergroup migration of nonhuman primates by Jean Balch Williams Download PDF EPUB FB2

The preponderance of Intergroup migration of nonhuman primates book relationships in humans suggest that humans are an outlier in the Primate order with respect to our intergroup behavior, even relative to more distantly related primates that, like humans, live in multilevel societies.

21 As is true for nonhuman primates, resources that are not defensible disincentivize aggression in humans; Cited by: 3. intergroup encounters in humans and nonhuman primates, especially the often-overlooked pressures that may favor tolerant encounters and asso- ciation given disincentives for aggression.

Request PDF | The evolution of intergroup tolerance in non-human primates and humans | Primate individuals use a variety of strategies in intergroup encounters, from. Intergroup encounters are common in nonhuman primates and can vary from affiliative to aggressive. We extracted data from the literature to test five different hypotheses: 1) where there are group size differences between opposing groups, whether the larger group is more likely to win an intergroup encounter than the smaller group; 2) whether the likelihood of Cited by: 1.

INTERGROUP CONFLICT IN NON-HUMAN PRIMATES Dr. Michelle Brown NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico pm Wednesday, October 1, Sanson Life Sciences, SC-1, Room Dr. Brown’s ongoing research explores the dynamics of conflicts between social groups, with a focus on the causes of individual.

the ultimate significance of intergroup aggression in nonhuman primates and humans is that dominant groups achieve increased access to either reproductive females or material resources. The relative importance of access to females vs.

material resources as the goals of intergroup aggression varies both between different. Topics range from facial expressions in nonhuman primates to the behavior and malnutrition in the rhesus monkey. The population structure and dynamics of the Borneo orang-utan in relation to its ecology and reproductive strategy are also discussed, along with the social organization of Macaca fascicularis.

The following points are relevant to the transportation of nonhuman primates: ” B. “Transportation of nonhuman primates requires adherence to the standards published in the Code of Federal Regulations as well as those pertaining to interstate/international movement of animals if applicable. ▪ Abstract Cultural primatology is hypothesized on the basis of social learning of group-specific behavior by nonhuman primates, especially in by: Tree of Origin gives us the latest news about bonobos, the make love not war apes who behave so dramatically unlike chimpanzees.

We learn about the tool traditions and social customs that set each ape community apart. We see how DNA analysis is revolutionizing our understanding of paternity, intergroup migration, and reproductive success.3/5(1).

First defined by C. Carpenter in“consortship” has retained a central role in the conceptual tool kit used by students of the mating behavior of multimale group‐living primates. Systematic coding of 48 published works revealed that a heterogeneous set of phenomena has been subsumed under the consortship concept, ranging from brief copulations neither Cited by: Chapter 1.

History of the Use of Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research. Human and Nonhuman Primates to Establishment of the National Institutes of Health’s National Primate Research Centers Program in the USA: Crossing the Threshold. – Period of Growth in a World of Increasing Constraints.

Flexible and changing behavioral patterns among non-human primates interest scientists because they provide clues about: A. the earliest development of human cultural behavior B. the psychological challenge that non-human primates face C. migration behavior and possible human physical developments D.

the evolution of the great apes. The pandemic is an ongoing humanitarian disaster, but concerns have also been raised about impacts of SARS-CoV-2 on non-human animals, especially our closest living relatives, the great apes and other primates.

Outbreaks of other human diseases among wild primates in the past have had fatal consequences. ―Susan Okie, Washington Post Book World “A fascinating bunch of essays They re-examine human social evolution from the perspective of naturalistic observations of non-human primates, and then extrapolate to humans.”―Laura Spinney, New Scientist “De Waal's is just one of a fascinating bunch of essays by primatologists in Tree of Origin.

They re-examine human social /5(6). The past decade has seen dramatically increased use of mouse models of allergic asthma to study the fundamental immunologic causes of the disease, as contrasted to the pharmacologic or physiologic consequences, and to identify and test novel therapeutic strategies (1, 2).This increased focus has not been without controversy (), and there are ample reasons Cited by:   We see how DNA analysis is revolutionizing our understanding of paternity, intergroup migration, and reproductive success.

And we confront intriguing discoveries about primate hunting behavior, politics, cognition, diet, and the evolution of language and intelligence that challenge claims of human uniqueness in new and subtle ways/5(80). The effect of intergroup competition on intragroup affiliation in primates Author links open overlay panel B.

Majolo a A. de Bortoli Vizioli b c J. Lehmann d Show moreCited by:   Nonhuman primates display stable differences in temperament and personality (e.g., in response to novelty, or extent of social engagement).

There are marked neuroendocrine differences among nonhuman primates of the same rank but with differing personalities (11, 12). It will be interesting to see if personality modulates the link between social.

where are nonhuman primates found. tropical or semitropical areas of the new and old worlds. T or F: no nonhuman primate is adapted to a fully terrestrial lifestyle, so they all spend some time in the trees. true. how many and what are the different kinds of teeth that almost all rpiamtes have.

Since the great apes are the nonhuman primates most closely related to humans genetically, they are the primary subject of the studies in this volume. Dr. Karen Strier broadens the horizon with her study of the muriqui, a South American monkey.4/5(7).

The authors draw on their collective years of research observing nonhuman primates to find comparisons between primates and man in such areas as ecology, sex and reproduction, social organization, culture, cognition, language, and : $  Purchase Primate Behavior - 1st Edition.

Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBook Edition: 1.